Electronic submission

Foundations

For more information on audio feedback, read Peter Ice's article, 'Using...

Student papers and projects will require the use of a file upload/download submission tool, sometimes referred to as a 'drop box'. Electronic submission tools allow your students to submit a variety of file types, and enable you to view, grade, and manage student submissions in an orderly way. Typically, there are also settings that allow for peer review of student work. This can be an effective way of encouraging student-to-student interaction, and of building discussion around student work. Take some time to explore the submission features available within your LMS/VLE.

When you are designing papers and projects, also consider how you can support student learning through a revise and rewrite process. Electronic submission tools typically include features that allow for multiple submissions (practice submissions, research paper outlines, project drafts, etc.), enabling you to download files and to edit them with feedback, before then uploading for student review.

Do this icon

Be clear in your assignment instructions so that students are aware of the file type that you are asking for, and always insist that students use a unique identifier (e.g. surname) in their project/paper filename! Before you set up an assignment for submission, check with the relevant department at your institution to determine the maximum file size that students can upload, and include this information in your assignment instructions.

In the following activity, click on each step to find out more about how technology tools can be used to facilitate multiple submissions of a writing assignment or project in support of student learning.

The following paragraphs will explain more about how technology tools can be used to facilitate multiple submissions of a writing assignment or project in support of student learning.

Your context

To help your students cite resources correctly, you may wish to direct them to...

Step 1 of 5: Students work alone or in groups on papers/projects

  • Let students know in advance what file types you want them to hand in. Typical file types are Microsoft Word (.doc or .docx) and Adobe PDF.
  • Consider having students work together on projects and papers using collaborative writing tools such as Google Docs or commenting features in Adobe Acrobat and Microsoft Word.

Step 2 of 5: Submission area opens for students to upload papers/projects

When asking students to submit assignments electronically, you will want to review the following settings:

  • File types: Select the appropriate file type you want your students to be able to upload.
  • Number of submissions: Consider how many times you want your students to be able to submit papers/projects. Be aware that a student may make an error and request to resubmit.
  • Grade entry: If your submission area is tied to a grade book and you want to have a draft/revision process, check options for only marking/grading the final submission.
  • Review options: Check whether students are able to review each other's submissions.

Step 3 of 5: Students submit papers/projects

  • Submitted assignments are typically date- and time-stamped, so you will know when your students are handing in papers/projects. You may have the option of setting a closing date.
  • It is likely that you will be able to extend the deadline and you can consider creating a separate submission area for late assignments.
  • Steer away from having students submit their papers/projects to you as email attachments. This makes it difficult to track student work!
  • Provide a format for file-naming that will ensure each student's submission has a unique name.

Step 4 of 5: Review process takes place

  • If you are thinking about peer review, plan in advance if you want students to review each other's work before or after you grade it.
  • If you are considering a draft/review process, provide guidance on submission dates. Add them to the course calendar and post regular reminder announcements to keep students on track.
  • Look for settings that will enable you to download all work to an offline folder, outside of your LMS/VLE.
  • Look for areas within the LMS/VLE or submission tool for comment input boxes to add feedback on student papers and projects.
  • Make sure you let your students know when you will be returning their assignments!

Step 5 of 5: Grades and feedback are provided

  • Let your students know in advance the type of feedback you will be providing (you will learn more about feedback types later in the course!).
  • Check for settings related to when you can make grades available to students.
  • Consider inserting an associated marking rubric as the last page of their project/paper so that their feedback packet includes reference to how you graded their work.

Using feedback tools

Download

Download the attached document from WebLearn, which explains 'How to...

Did you know?

If your institution subscribes to Turnitin, you can use GradeMark to...

Useful links

JISC Digital Media, a body that helps educational institutions get the most...

Portfolio activity

Reflect on your desired approaches to providing feedback on written and...

Frequent feedback is an integral component of student learning, and technology tools will enable you to provide rich feedback to your students. Integrating a variety of feedback tools into your online teaching will reinforce student engagement and participation.

Technology tools enable you to provide written, audio, video, and real-time conferencing feedback to your students on their paper/project submissions for both acknowledgment and informational purposes. Using your LMS/VLE reporting tools you may also be able to review who has not submitted their assignments, and keep tardy students on track with email reminders.

In the following activity, consider the questions related to feedback tools for written and project-based student work, and click on the 'Hint' button for a prompt. Click 'Feedback' to view our suggested options, and 'Next' to move through the questions.
You will now be presented with some questions relating to feedback tools for written and project-based student work. For each question, consider the 'Hint' and your response, then continue on for our thoughts.

Question 1 of 4:

How would you use tools to provide written feedback?

Hint: Written feedback is very useful to guide student progress in the draft review process leading to final paper/project submission.

Our thoughts:

  • Use standard word-processing tools to add written feedback to assignments using the 'Add Comments' and 'Track Changes' features.
  • Use the 'Comments' feature in Adobe Acrobat to insert written feedback.
  • Use the commenting feature in Google Drive (formerly Docs).

Question 2 of 4:

How would you use tools to provide audio feedback?

Hint: Adding your voice to feedback on assignments helps foster social presence and student engagement.

Our thoughts:

  • Use Microsoft Word's 'Insert Object' utility to create and embed an audio file within a document
  • Record an audio file using the free Audacity tool and upload it as an attachment along with graded assignments
  • Use the 'Audio Comment' tool features in Adobe Acrobat Professional to embed comments which can be listened to in Acrobat Reader (free of charge)
  • Note: Check the file size before you send audio comments to students. Note that audio comments in Acrobat do not dramatically increase file size.

Question 3 of 4:

How would you use tools to provide video feedback?

Hint: Video feedback allows you to provide more natural, conversational feedback to your students.

Our thoughts:

  • Use real-time video conferencing tools and schedule review meetings with individual students or groups
  • Create a video file and use Microsoft Word's 'Insert Object' utility to embed the file within a document
  • Use a screencasting application such as Jing to capture video and then email the private link to students along with graded assignments
  • Note: embedding video within a Microsoft Word document can dramatically increase the file size. Consider linking to external video resources.

Question 4 of 4:

How would you use tools to provide preventive feedback?

Hint: Preventive feedback includes using LMS/VLE reporting features to monitor completion of work.

Our thoughts:

Preventive feedback includes any intervention you use to guide student progress, such as:

  • Setting up automatic reminder messages to send to students who have not submitted assignments on time
  • Checking reporting features with your LMS/VLE to see if a student has not accessed the online classroom or specific assignment and contacting that student
  • Checking on student trends within your course grade book frequently and providing guidance and support to students who appear to need help.

Feedback tip

As you begin to incorporate feedback tools into your online teaching, try integrating a practice submission exercise to check if your students are able to open and access your comments and feedback in advance of an actual assignment.


Foundations

Your context

To help your students cite resources correctly, you may wish to direct them to any online source referencing information or style guides provided by your institution's library and/or learning support unit.

Download

Download the attached document from WebLearn, which explains 'How to create audio feedback'.

Did you know?

If your institution subscribes to Turnitin, you can use GradeMark to give rich feedback to students, using your desktop computer, laptop or smart device or tablet. Features include originality checking, the ability to add voice or text comments, 'QuickMarks' enabling teachers to drag and drop common corrections on to a paper, and the ability to attach rubrics for quick and easy marking: http://submit.ac.uk/en_int/features/grademark

Useful links

Portfolio

Duration: 30 minutes

Reflect on your desired approaches to providing feedback on written and project-based student work:

  • What benefits do you see in providing written feedback on student work?
  • What benefits do you see in providing audio feedback on student work?
  • What benefits do you see in providing video feedback on student work?

Use the attached document to record your responses, or use the relevant page of your Teaching Online portfolio.